ہفتہ    . 2017   . 19 : 48 : 8   .  
Technology News

Playing with RIM's BlackBerry PlayBook

The good: RIM's BlackBerry PlayBook is a fast, powerful 7-inch tablet with HDMI output, advanced multitasking and security, and a browser that integrates Adobe Flash 10.2 for a desktop-style Web experience.

The bad: The 7-inch screen cramps the powerful browser, the wake button is almost impossible to push, and some stalwart features are only available when pairing a BlackBerry phone.

The bottom line: The BlackBerry PlayBook ably showcases RIM's powerful new mobile operating system, but its middling size diminishes many of its best features.

Review: If you thought the tablet wars were just between Apple and Google, think again. Research In Motion may be late to the fight, but it is fighting for its life, and the BlackBerry PlayBook tablet demonstrates that the company means business.Like the Apple iPad, the PlayBook is available for as low as $499 (16GB), or as much as $599 (32GB) and $699 (64GB) if you need the extra capacity. For now, the tablet is restricted to Wi-Fi (though Bluetooth tethering is possible), with 4G models planned for later in the year.

Summary: I fully understand that the IPAD users will rip on any other tablet but the bottom line for a product to be good or bad is if it meets the users needs. Many people love their IPAD and they should. It is a very good product. There is also a very loarge group of users that have black berries- normally for work! Their work provides the Blackberry mail servers. This is the target market for Blackberry. I work for a very large corportation that supplies Blackberrries to a lot fo the employees, the Play book fits our needs and with work supporting it fully, this is the way to go for most of us. I also like the idea that I can use my work Black Berry's data plan and not have to have a data plan (con for IPAD and other tablets). As for the size, I carry enough stuff now. For me, I have been waiting 6 months. Have mine on reserve. The intergration with work mail and other systems is what matters for me.


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2012 presidential candidates `friend' social media

NEW YORK ? Republican Tim Pawlenty disclosed his 2012 presidential aspirations on Facebook. Rival Mitt Romney did it with a tweet. President Barack Obama kicked off his re-election bid with a digital video emailed to the 13 million online backers who helped power his historic campaign in 2008.

Welcome to The Social Network, presidential campaign edition. The candidates and contenders have embraced the Internet to far greater degrees than previous White House campaigns, communicating directly with voters on platforms where they work and play. If Obama's online army helped define the last campaign and Howard Dean's Internet fundraising revolutionized the Democratic primary in 2004, next year's race will be the first to reflect the broad cultural migration to the digital world.

"You have to take your message to the places where people are consuming content and spending their time," said Romney's online director, Zac Moffatt. "We have to recognize that people have choices and you have to reach them where they are, and on their terms."

The most influential of those destinations include the video sharing website YouTube; Facebook, the giant social network with 500 million active users; and Twitter, the cacophonous conversational site where news is made and shared in tweets of 140 characters or less.

All the campaigns have a robust Facebook presence, using the site to post videos and messages and to host online discussions. In the latest indication of the site's reach and influence, Obama plans to visit Facebook headquarters in California this coming Wednesday for a live chat with company founder Mark Zuckerberg and to take questions from users who submit questions on the site.

Candidates have embraced Twitter with an intensity that rivals pop star Justin Bieber's. Twitter was the Republican hopefuls' platform of choice last Wednesday, moments after Obama gave a budget speech calling for some tax increases and decrying GOP proposals to cut Medicare.

"President Obama doesn't get it. The fear of higher taxes tomorrow hurts job creation today," Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour tweeted.

"The president's plan will kill jobs and increase the deficit," former House Speaker Newt Gingrich warned in a tweet, attaching a link to a more detailed statement posted on Facebook.

In the past, candidates would have pointed supporters to their websites for such a response. Now, as Moffatt puts it, "the campaign site may be headquarters, but it needs digital embassies across the web."

Republicans once seemed slow to harness the power of the web. The party's 2008 nominee, Arizona Sen. John McCain, told reporters he didn't even use email. The 2012 hopefuls have worked hard to prove their Internet savvy, particularly with social media.

Pawlenty "understands the power of new technology and he wants it to be at the forefront. We are going to compete aggressively with President Obama in this space," spokesman Alex Conant said. Conant pointed to efforts to live stream videos to Facebook and award points and badges to supporters in a way that mirrors Foursquare, the emerging location-based mobile site.

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, McCain's 2008 running mate and a potential presidential candidate this time, has made Facebook a centerpiece of her communication efforts to supporters.

Palin has been criticized for treating it as a one-way form of communication that allows her to bypass direct questions from reporters and voters. Other Republicans insist they're willing to wade into the messy digital fray and cede some control of their message.

"We trust our supporters and want to err on the side of giving them more control, not less," Conant said.

Just as social networking liberates candidates to take their message directly to voters, it offers plenty of pitfalls as well.

It's prone to mischief, with dozens of fake Twitter accounts and Facebook pages popping up daily that are intended to embarrass the candidates. Also, a candidate's gaffe or an inconsistency on issues can be counted on to go viral immediately.

Gingrich has gotten ensnared in some online traps. His apparent back-and-forth on whether the U.S. should intervene in the conflict in Libya was discussed widely and amplified online. He first advocated military engagement, then came out against it after Obama ordered airstrikes.

Twitter lit up with the news that a photo on Gingrich's exploratory website showing people waving flags was a stock photo once used by the late liberal Sen. Ted Kennedy, D-Mass.

Spokesman Rick Tyler rejected such criticism and said Gingrich has pioneered the use of digital technology.

"Over 1.4 million people follow him on Twitter. He has a very active Facebook. There are eight websites connected to organizations started by Newt (that) use social media platforms to communicate to their coalitions," Tyler said.

But Josh Dorner, who tracks GOP candidates online for the Center for American Progress, a liberal think tank, said the Republican presidential hopefuls appear to be unprepared for the unforgiving pace of the digital age.

Obama, who in 2008 had to recover from plenty of web-amplified flubs such as his comment that bitter small town voters "cling" to guns and religion, will probably be more nimble, Dorner said.

"We are moving in a warp speed environment, and none of the Republican candidates understand the media environment in which they're operating. It puts them at a huge disadvantage to the president," Dorner said.

Strategists also say the greatest digital innovation in 2012 may not even have surfaced yet, even as campaigns figure out how to do effective microtargeting ads for Facebook and work to develop "apps" for smart phones rather than laptops and traditional TV.

"As with anything, there's going to be a shiny new cell phone every six months," said Matt Ortega, a former online organizer for the Democratic National Committee. "You're going to see both new tools and more sophistication in existing tools."


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Why Users Are More Engaged With Social Media on Fridays

Analyzing more than 200 of its clients' Facebook pages over a 14-day period, Buddy Media found that engagement on Thursdays and Fridays was 18% higher than the rest of the week, and that engagement was actually even better on Thursday than on Friday. Meanwhile, Twitter Chief Revenue Officer Adam Bain ? speaking at the Ad Age Digital conference earlier this week ? said that Twitter users are more engaged with tweets on Fridays.

The reason is fairly obvious, says Jeremiah Owyang, a partner at the Altimeter Group: "People are heading into the weekend so they're thinking about things besides work. They're mentally checking out and transitioning to the weekend."

Rick Liebling, director of digital strategy at Coyne PR, concurs: "It's a matter of people finally pushing past the work week and coasting toward the weekend, picking their head up a bit to see what's going on and what their friends are up to."

However, Liebling adds that there might be another factor at work: There may be fewer posts overall on Fridays, which means a greater number of average click-throughs.

Dan Zarrella, a social media scientist at HubSpot, agrees with that assessment. "I call it 'contra-competitive timing,'" Zarrella says. "As the overall activity seems to slow down from the hustle and bustle of the week, readers can give each tweet more attention because there are fewer other tweets fighting for it."

Whatever the case, the fact that Thursdays and Fridays are the best days of the week for engagement isn't yet common knowledge among marketers. As Buddy Media CEO Michael Lazerow also noted at the Ad Age Digital conference, most brands are similarly unaware that their status updates will get more pickup if they're posted after work hours.

But Owyang says that what's generally true may not be applicable to many marketers, anyway. For instance, "Friday may not be the best time for the B2B audience because they're checking out mentally." Similarly, Lazerow said that for movie companies, the weekend is the sweet spot, but for other media companies, Monday is the worst day of the week. "It's the noisiest time to post," Lazerow said.


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U.S. shutters botnet, can disable malware remotely

By seizing servers and domain names and getting permission to remotely turn off malware on compromised PCs, U.S. officials have disabled a botnet that steals data from infected computers.

The legal actions are part of the "most complete and comprehensive enforcement action ever taken by U.S. authorities to disable an international botnet," according to a statement from the Department of Justice. A botnet is a group of computers that have been compromised and are being remotely controlled by attackers, typically to send spam or attack other computers.

It's the first time law enforcement in the U.S. has requested permission from a court to take control of a botnet, according to a request for a temporary restraining order that was granted. Similar action was taken by Dutch officials who downloaded "good" software to computers infected with Bredolab botnet malware, the filing said.

In this case the malware, called "Coreflood," records keystrokes and private communications, enabling it to steal usernames, passwords, and other private personal and financial information. Once a computer is infected with Coreflood, the malware communicates with a command-and-control server, allowing it to remotely control the compromised computer. The botnet is believed to have infected more than 2 million Windows-based computers worldwide in nearly 10 years.

Prosecutors allege that data stolen by the malware has been used to steal funds from victims' accounts. In at least one case, the malware enabled attackers to take over an online banking session a victim was in the middle of and transfer money to a foreign account, according to court filings.

The U.S. Attorney's office in the district of Connecticut has filed a civil complaint against 13 "John Doe," or unknown, defendants accusing them of wire fraud, bank fraud, and illegal interception of electronic communications. To shut down the botnet and stop it from spreading further, the Justice Department seized five command-and-control servers and 29 domain names used by the bots to communicate with the servers.

To put a halt to the botnet's damage to already infected computers, officials have obtained a temporary restraining order authorizing them to substitute the seized servers with their own and use them to respond to signals sent from hundreds of thousands of compromised computers in the U.S. This will allow authorities to send commands to the infected computers that stop the malware from running, preventing attackers from updating the malware and giving victimized computers time to update their virus signatures.

Officials also are working with Internet Service Providers to identify owners of the compromised computers based on their IP addresses and warn them about the potential for fraud because of the malware on the machines. Computer owners will be told how to "opt out" if they do not want officials to stop the malware from running on their machines. "At no time will law enforcement authorities access any information that may be stored on an infected computer," the statement said.

"Allowing Coreflood to continue running on the infected computers will cause a continuing and substantial injury to the owners and users of the infected computers, exposing them to a loss of privacy and an increased risk of further computer intrusions," Judge Vanessa Bryant wrote in her decision granting the temporary restraining order.

The substitute command-and-control server will be operated by the nonprofit Internet Systems Consortium under law enforcement supervision, according to court documents. Microsoft, meanwhile, was expected to update its Malicious Software Removal Tool yesterday to remove Coreflood from infected computers, the filing dated yesterday says.

While the actions have disabled Coreflood in its current form, other variants of the malware could still be lurking on the Internet, officials said.

From March 2009 through January 2010, one Coreflood server had about 190 gigabytes of data from 413,710 infected computers, the court filing shows. Of known victims, a real estate company in Michigan was defrauded out of $115,771; a law firm in South Carolina lost $78,421, an investment company in North Carolina lost $151,201; and a defense contractor in Tennessee lost $241,866, but nearly lost $934,528 in attempted wire transfers, the document says.

The Justice Department is working with the FBI, the U.S. Marshals Service, and the U.S. Attorney's office in Connecticut with help from Microsoft and the Internet Systems Consortium.


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Survey: Most Android users 'hate Apple'

In this peculiarly materialistic world, brands can become the object of quite passionate detestation. I confess that there are certain brands, usually for entirely irrational reasons, that make much of my bodily hair rebel against gravity. Birkenstock, for example.

But our subject today is whether the Android brand attracts, at its core, not those who love Android, but those who hate Apple.

I ask because the Business Insider published the results of a survey it conducted that offer some prickly conclusions.

Among more than 2,000 respondents, the survey seems to have found polarization beyond all comments sections of tech blogs. The majority of these public-spirited people were Android users.

The majority of these Android users purportedly would never consider buying an iPhone, for one very simply reason: They "hate Apple."

Indeed, only 31.2 percent of these Android users would consider buying an iPhone if it "worked better with non-iPhone apps and products." While 55.7 percent ticked the box that said, "Nothing: I hate Apple."

Being somewhat survey-cynical, I am guessing that the mere existence of a box that said "hate Apple" was far too difficult for some enthusiastic people to resist. But is it possible that one of the Android brand's most compelling characteristics is its appeal to those who have an irrational (or merely rational) hate of Apple?

The Android brand is increasingly becoming "a brand." The little green short-legged robot thingy is adorning stores, ads, and even dancing in a frenzied manner in shopping malls. (Video embedded here. Please enjoy.)

There are many who are happy with their Android phones, and, if this survey is to be believed, the majority of these people will upgrade only to another Android phone. But the results of this survey throw up a difficult conundrum: if the majority of Android users won't buy Apple because of "hate," then do they secretly believe that the iPhone is actually better than their own phone, but produced by a loathsome company?

One has to be also somewhat open-eyed about who responded to this survey.

The majority of respondents apparently said that the most important things for them when choosing a smartphone were "features" and "platform." This seems remarkably left-brained and therefore remarkably inhuman. Which suggests that many of the respondents might have been tech-leaning insiders, rather than a true cross-section of the outside world.

I have a strange hunch that ease of use, simplicity of design and, yes, the cool factor might just enjoy prominent seats at the decision-making high table for many people. It's harder in a survey to explain how a product is emotionally better, rather than rationally so. It's easier to say that you just hate another brand. So it may well be that Android users believe their phones are easy to use, well-designed, and cool. But the survey may not have given them the chance to explain it.

It's also tempting to conclude that if the Android brand really lives on a pedestal of Apple-loathing, then one can only wonder how many brands have ever had lengthy success purely by virtue of not being the "hated" brand. Do, for example, people stick with Verizon merely because it's not AT&T? Or might there be some more positive notion?

Some believe that the iPhone succeeds simply because people assume it's better and so don't even try anything else. But wouldn't it be lovely to learn why Android makes people happy, rather than this quaint and, frankly, suspicious notion that most of its users are card-carrying Apple-haters?


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Man Makes Music Out of an Old Game Boy [VIDEO]

Here?s a use for your old Game Boy that might not have occurred to you.

pLAY vIDEO NOW

A German Game Boy fan named Sebastian Bender has released a music video on YouTube that is made up of clicks, spring-twiddling and button-pressing on the device. With 200,000 views since April 6, it?s catching on.

It?s a unique use for the game player, for sure, but maybe not as unique as you think. Last year, another fan netted more than 1 million views for an all-Game Boy rendition of Michael Jackson?s "Beat It."

The latest generation of Nintendo handheld devices, the 3DS, was released March 27.


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Cisco plans to shut its Flip camcorder business

NEW YORK ? Cisco Systems Inc., the world's largest maker of computer networking gear, on Tuesday said it's killing its Flip camcorder business as part of a reversal of years of efforts at diversifying into consumer products.

The about-face comes after several quarters of disappointing results and challenges in its core businesses. Analysts say the company has been trying to do too many different things.

A week ago, CEO John Chambers acknowledged the criticism, sending employees a memo vowing to take "bold steps" to narrow the company's focus.

The San Jose, Calif., company said Tuesday that it expects its consumer business shakeup will result in the loss of 550 jobs, or less than 1 percent of its work force of about 73,000.

It also expects to take restructuring charges of no more than $300 million spread out over the current quarter, which ends April 25, and the following one.

Cisco bought Pure Digital Technologies Inc., the maker of the Flip camcorder, for $590 million in 2009, just two years after the San Francisco-based company made its first camera. It quickly became a top seller because of its ease of use. A signature feature, since copied by many other manufacturers, was a USB connector that flipped out of the case, letting the user connect the camera directly to a computer. The camera even contained video-editing software that fired up on the computer.

Cisco appears to see no point in selling the business ? the announcement Tuesday said Flip will be closed down. It will continue to support the sharing of Flip videos online.

The company said it will realign its remaining consumer business to support four of its five key priorities ? routers and switches; corporate communications and collaboration equipment; servers for data centers and video.

That means it's retrenching on another consumer video business ? home videoconferencing. In November, Cisco started selling the umi, a $599 box that turns a high-definition TV into a big videophone. But signs soon emerged that the umi wasn't doing well. It cut the price of the unit in March, along with the monthly service fee, which went from $24.95 per month to $99 per year.

On Tuesday, Cisco said it will fold umi into its corporate videoconferencing business and stop selling the box through retailers. Instead, it will sell it through corporate channels and Internet service providers.

Cisco's Home Networking business, which makes Wi-Fi routers and has the 2003 acquisition of Linksys at its core, will be "refocused for greater profitability," but Cisco will keep selling the routers in stores.

Cisco shares rose 2 cents to $17.49 in morning trading. The shares are still close to their 52-week low of $16.97, hit a month ago.


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Microsoft Dips Toes in Local Deal Waters -- in Sweden

Microsoft is hopping gingerly aboard the local deals bandwagon; its first test market is Sweden, where it is launching Lokaldealen, a service that is exactly what it sounds like.

The service is a result of the software giant's partnership with Lokaldelen (see what they did there?), a Swedish business directory.

Lokaldealen's offers are exactly what you'd expect to find on any Groupon clone's site: Users purchase limited-time-offer vouchers for discounts of popular goods and services.

For example, the current deal in Stockholm is 30 pieces of sushi for 140 kronor, a discount from the normal price of 285 kronor. The deal is running for 32 hours longer; so far, nine people have purchased vouchers.

In addition to the partnership with an established brand, the service is getting a social boost via a Facebook tie-in.

Microsoft will market the deals on the Swedish version of the MSN portal, in Hotmail and via Live. Microsoft told Swedish business newspaper Dagens Industri that Lokaldealen currently employs a 300-person salesforce and is preparing to do business in 12 districts in Sweden. The service is now available in Stockholm, Gothenburg and Malm?.

Groupon has already established a presence in Sweden and is Microsoft's main competitor in that country for daily deals. If the Lokaldealen is a hit in Sweden, the rest of Europe is next on Microsoft's list.

Check out the official promo clip for the new service, and in the comments, let us know if you think Microsoft's first foray into local deals will fly or flop.


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IBM Jumps Into Cloud, Customers Tip-toe Behind

In announcing its cloud computing services on Thursday, IBM stressed repeatedly that private clouds -- or those that exist behind the corporate firewall -- are as important to its strategy as those in the public realm.

It seems like a wise strategy, given that even the IBM customers brought to a company event here to showcase their cloud development efforts were either not using the public cloud at all, or still in the early stages with it.

Tony Kerrison, CTO at financial services firm ING, said his company is running "zero" applications today in the public cloud. Like other financial services firms, ING is heavily bound by regulatory requirements, as well as strict European Union rules about where its customer data can be stored.

Even putting e-mail in the cloud, which is first on Kerrison's wish list, will be "a challenge" because of the regulatory issues, he said in an interview at IBM's Cloud Forum in San Francisco, where IBM announced its latest public and private cloud offerings.

Carlos Matos, senior director for infrastructure management and systems integration at Kaiser Permanente, said his company "dipped our toes" into a cloud initiative this year. Scott Skellenger, senior director for global IT operations Illumina, a life sciences firm that provides genotyping services, declined to specify what applications, if any, his company is running in the cloud.

That's not to say IBM doesn't have plenty of customers using its cloud services. But it highlights the challenges of getting enterprise customers, especially in data-sensitive industries such as health and finance, to embrace public services.

IBM announced two tiers of cloud service at the event Thursday, under the umbrella name of the IBM SmartCloud.

One, the Enterprise service, is an infrastructure-as-a-service offering similar to those from Amazon Web Services. Customers can deploy Windows or Linux applications in IBM data centers and IBM says it will guarantee 99.5 percent uptime annually.

The other, Enterprise Plus, offers higher levels of security and a 99.9 percent uptime guarantee, plus the option to run virtual machines on dedicated hardware, rather than servers shared with other customers, and the option to use AIX as well Windows and Linux.

Enterprise Plus users also get more flexible management, security and availability options. IBM will manage just the hardware and hypervisors, for example, or almost any combination of the OS, middleware, application or entire business process.

"IBM is trying to go a step further than the standard cloud offerings already out there, in terms of security, reliability and availability," said IDC analyst Jean Bozman.

The SmartCloud services aren't entirely new -- IBM has offered them on a custom basis for some time. But it's the first time they are being widely offered as a listed product with a fixed menu of options, said Steve Mills, senior vice president and group executive in charge of IBM's software division.

Pricing wasn't immediately available, but some published reports said the basic Enterprise service is comparable in price to Amazon Web Services, or a little more expensive.

They service will compete with those from Hewlett-Packard, among others, which made its own cloud pitch last month. But while HP hasn't said when its offerings will appear, IBM said its Enterprise service is available now worldwide, and Enterprise Plus will follow later this year.

IBM is also offering the products behind the services as a hardware and software package that companies can deploy in their own data centers. It includes numerous Tivoli and Systems Director products, including Tivoli Service Automation Manager and Tivoli Provisioning Manager for Images.

Public and private clouds are "equally valid," Mills said. "There's nothing about the attributes that you can't implement inside a business," including provisioning new apps in a standard, automated fashion across a pool of virtual computing resources.

The biggest challenge for enterprises will be management, according to IBM, in particular the proliferation of virtual machines and software images. It hopes to distinguish itself from other cloud providers by the level of security and management it says it can offer.

"We see the proliferation of images happening at a rate that makes the proliferation of Intel machines look like it was happening in slow motion," said Robert LeBlanc, IBM senior vice president for middleware.

IBM officials played down the suggestion that they will be competing more directly with partners, such as telecommunications providers, who have been offering their own cloud software based on IBM software. Such "coopetition" is normal in the industry, Mills said.

Although ING isn't using a public cloud, it is deploying "utility" applications such as social media tools on a private cloud, Kerrison said. It has a mix of x86 and IBM Power systems, and the company uses IBM's Tivoli software to abstract the hardware underneath and manage all the servers "at a higher level," he said.

The ITIL best practices for IT are geared towards physical infrastructure, Kerrison noted, so ING has developed its own processes to ensure software stacks in its cloud are as standardized as possible. That makes them easier to manage, and also helps with software development lifecycles, he said: "Developers are clear when new stack releases are coming out. We treat our stacks really like a software release," he said.

ING has found that no single vendor can move a company through the whole process of virtualizing systems and building an internal cloud, Kerrison said.

"I'd recommend forming an ecosystem of partners that's right for your business," he said.

Skellinger, of the life sciences firm Illumina, said moving to the cloud requires greater "business acumen" in areas like contract management.

"Sometimes the skills you needed yesterday aren't going to be the ones you need tomorrow," he said.


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Facebook makes its server, data center design open-source

A three-column custom-built Facebook server rack. The social network is open-sourcing the specs of its server and data center design with the Open Compute Project. (Credit: James Martin/CNET)

PALO ALTO, Calif.--Finding that industry standard servers weren't meeting their needs, Facebook began designing its own servers and the data centers they sit in starting a year ago. Today the company shared the specifications for others who want to build their own servers like Facebook as part of an open-source effort they're calling the Open Compute Project.

"What we learned as we transitioned from being a small start-up--one office in a garage--to where we are today--a slightly bigger start-up--is that there are a couple ways you can go about designing data centers and servers," said CEO Mark Zuckerberg. "You can build them yourselves and work with ODMs (original design manufacturers) or you can basically get whatever the products are that the mass manufacturers of servers put out. We found the mass manufacturers weren't in line with what we needed and what social apps need."

Head of Facebook technical operations Jonathan Heiliger said it had taken three people a year and a half at the company's Prineville, Ore., data center to get their data center and servers to achieve higher efficiency and cost effectiveness. Because they want to encourage innovation and drive the cost down for building more of these, Facebook says they want to share it with their competitors and peers.

CEO Mark Zuckerberg talks about why industry standard servers weren't meeting Facebook's needs.

CEO Mark Zuckerberg talks about why industry standard servers weren't meeting Facebook's needs. (Credit: James Martin/CNET)

"It's time to stop treating data centers like Fight Club and demystify them," said Heiliger.

Open Compute includes all the specs, schematics, and basic instructions for building a data center and the servers inside them in the style of Facebook, which needs lots of computing power for its 500 million users sharing pictures, links, and messages in real time.

What Facebook says makes its server and data center design worthy of being copied is the power efficiency they've achieved and the money they're able to save.

The big things that set apart Facebook's data center design is that there's no air conditioning, which sucks extra power, in their data center. Instead there's a water-misting system for cooling and the hot air coming off the servers is recycled for heating attached buildings. The data center also uses 480-volt electrical distribution centers throughout.

The server chassis itself has been stripped down to almost nothing, using 22 percent fewer materials, according to Amir Michael, who designed the new server for Facebook. They've employed a non-industry standard size server that's a little taller, 1.5u height, which allowed taller heat sinks and larger fans, and utilized a more efficient power supply, he said.

Overall, Facebook says they've created servers that are 38 percent more efficient than the ones they were buying, and simultaneously saved 24 percent in costs. And they hope the wider technology community will improve those numbers once they get their hands on Facebook's blueprint.

In a marketing video shown after the presentation, Heiliger sent a message to the industry. "Use it, improve it, and adapt it. Take our philosophy and adopt it in your own business. Sharing software has existed for many years, but it hasn't established a foothold in the hardware industry yet."

stem for cooling and the hot air coming off the servers is recycled for heating attached buildings. The data center also uses 480-volt electrical distribution centers throughout.

The server chassis itself has been stripped down to almost nothing, using 22 percent fewer materials, according to Amir Michael, who designed the new server for Facebook. They've employed a non-industry standard size server that's a little taller, 1.5u height, which allowed taller heat sinks and larger fans, and utilized a more efficient power supply, he said.

Overall, Facebook says they've created servers that are 38 percent more efficient than the ones they were buying, and simultaneously saved 24 percent in costs. And they hope the wider technology community will improve those numbers once they get their hands on Facebook's blueprint.

In a marketing video shown after the presentation, Heiliger sent a message to the industry. "Use it, improve it, and adapt it. Take our philosophy and adopt it in your own business. Sharing software has existed for many years, but it hasn't established a foothold in the hardware industry yet."

ds on Facebook's blueprint.

In a marketing video shown after the presentation, Heiliger sent a message to the industry. "Use it, improve it, and adapt it. Take our philosophy and adopt it in your own business. Sharing software has existed for many years, but it hasn't established a foothold in the hardware industry yet."

stem for cooling and the hot air coming off the servers is recycled for heating attached buildings. The data center also uses 480-volt electrical distribution centers throughout.

The server chassis itself has been stripped down to almost nothing, using 22 percent fewer materials, according to Amir Michael, who designed the new server for Facebook. They've employed a non-industry standard size server that's a little taller, 1.5u height, which allowed taller heat sinks and larger fans, and utilized a more efficient power supply, he said.

Overall, Facebook says they've created servers that are 38 percent more efficient than the ones they were buying, and simultaneously saved 24 percent in costs. And they hope the wider technology community will improve those numbers once they get their hands on Facebook's blueprint.

In a marketing video shown after the presentation, Heiliger sent a message to the industry. "Use it, improve it, and adapt it. Take our philosophy and adopt it in your own business. Sharing software has existed for many years, but it hasn't established a foothold in the hardware industry yet."

height, which allowed taller heat sinks and larger fans, and utilized a more efficient power supply, he said.

Overall, Facebook says they've created servers that are 38 percent more efficient than the ones they were buying, and simultaneously saved 24 percent in costs. And they hope the wider technology community will improve those numbers once they get their hands on Facebook's blueprint.

In a marketing video shown after the presentation, Heiliger sent a message to the industry. "Use it, improve it, and adapt it. Take our philosophy and adopt it in your own business. Sharing software has existed for many years, but it hasn't established a foothold in the hardware industry yet."

e of these, Facebook says they want to share it with their competitors and peers.

CEO Mark Zuckerberg talks about why industry standard servers weren't meeting Facebook's needs.

CEO Mark Zuckerberg talks about why industry standard servers weren't meeting Facebook's needs. (Credit: James Martin/CNET)

"It's time to stop treating data centers like Fight Club and demystify them," said Heiliger.

Open Compute includes all the specs, schematics, and basic instructions for building a data center and the servers inside them in the style of Facebook, which needs lots of computing power for its 500 million users sharing pictures, links, and messages in real time.

What Facebook says makes its server and data center design worthy of being copied is the power efficiency they've achieved and the money they're able to save.

The big things that set apart Facebook's data center design is that there's no air conditioning, which sucks extra power, in their data center. Instead there's a water-misting system for cooling and the hot air coming off the servers is recycled for heating attached buildings. The data center also uses 480-volt electrical distribution centers throughout.

The server chassis itself has been stripped down to almost nothing, using 22 percent fewer materials, according to Amir Michael, who designed the new server for Facebook. They've employed a non-industry standard size server that's a little taller, 1.5u height, which allowed taller heat sinks and larger fans, and utilized a more efficient power supply, he said.

Overall, Facebook says they've created servers that are 38 percent more efficient than the ones they were buying, and simultaneously saved 24 percent in costs. And they hope the wider technology community will improve those numbers once they get their hands on Facebook's blueprint.

In a marketing video shown after the presentation, Heiliger sent a message to the industry. "Use it, improve it, and adapt it. Take our philosophy and adopt it in your own business. Sharing software has existed for many years, but it hasn't established a foothold in the hardware industry yet."

stem for cooling and the hot air coming off the servers is recycled for heating attached buildings. The data center also uses 480-volt electrical distribution centers throughout.

The server chassis itself has been stripped down to almost nothing, using 22 percent fewer materials, according to Amir Michael, who designed the new server for Facebook. They've employed a non-industry standard size server that's a little taller, 1.5u height, which allowed taller heat sinks and larger fans, and utilized a more efficient power supply, he said.

Overall, Facebook says they've created servers that are 38 percent more efficient than the ones they were buying, and simultaneously saved 24 percent in costs. And they hope the wider technology community will improve those numbers once they get their hands on Facebook's blueprint.

In a marketing video shown after the presentation, Heiliger sent a message to the industry. "Use it, improve it, and adapt it. Take our philosophy and adopt it in your own business. Sharing software has existed for many years, but it hasn't established a foothold in the hardware industry yet."

ds on Facebook's blueprint.

In a marketing video shown after the presentation, Heiliger sent a message to the industry. "Use it, improve it, and adapt it. Take our philosophy and adopt it in your own business. Sharing software has existed for many years, but it hasn't established a foothold in the hardware industry yet."

stem for cooling and the hot air coming off the servers is recycled for heating attached buildings. The data center also uses 480-volt electrical distribution centers throughout.

The server chassis itself has been stripped down to almost nothing, using 22 percent fewer materials, according to Amir Michael, who designed the new server for Facebook. They've employed a non-industry standard size server that's a little taller, 1.5u height, which allowed taller heat sinks and larger fans, and utilized a more efficient power supply, he said.

Overall, Facebook says they've created servers that are 38 percent more efficient than the ones they were buying, and simultaneously saved 24 percent in costs. And they hope the wider technology community will improve those numbers once they get their hands on Facebook's blueprint.

In a marketing video shown after the presentation, Heiliger sent a message to the industry. "Use it, improve it, and adapt it. Take our philosophy and adopt it in your own business. Sharing software has existed for many years, but it hasn't established a foothold in the hardware industry yet."

height, which allowed taller heat sinks and larger fans, and utilized a more efficient power supply, he said.

Overall, Facebook says they've created servers that are 38 percent more efficient than the ones they were buying, and simultaneously saved 24 percent in costs. And they hope the wider technology community will improve those numbers once they get their hands on Facebook's blueprint.

In a marketing video shown after the presentation, Heiliger sent a message to the industry. "Use it, improve it, and adapt it. Take our philosophy and adopt it in your own business. Sharing software has existed for many years, but it hasn't established a foothold in the hardware industry yet."

ycled for heating attached buildings. The data center also uses 480-volt electrical distribution centers throughout.

The server chassis itself has been stripped down to almost nothing, using 22 percent fewer materials, according to Amir Michael, who designed the new server for Facebook. They've employed a non-industry standard size server that's a little taller, 1.5u height, which allowed taller heat sinks and larger fans, and utilized a more efficient power supply, he said.

Overall, Facebook says they've created servers that are 38 percent more efficient than the ones they were buying, and simultaneously saved 24 percent in costs. And they hope the wider technology community will improve those numbers once they get their hands on Facebook's blueprint.

In a marketing video shown after the presentation, Heiliger sent a message to the industry. "Use it, improve it, and adapt it. Take our philosophy and adopt it in your own business. Sharing software has existed for many years, but it hasn't established a foothold in the hardware industry yet."

height, which allowed taller heat sinks and larger fans, and utilized a more efficient power supply, he said.

Overall, Facebook says they've created servers that are 38 percent more efficient than the ones they were buying, and simultaneously saved 24 percent in costs. And they hope the wider technology community will improve those numbers once they get their hands on Facebook's blueprint.

In a marketing video shown after the presentation, Heiliger sent a message to the industry. "Use it, improve it, and adapt it. Take our philosophy and adopt it in your own business. Sharing software has existed for many years, but it hasn't established a foothold in the hardware industry yet."

old in the hardware industry yet."

ller, 1.5u height, which allowed taller heat sinks and larger fans, and utilized a more efficient power supply, he said.

Overall, Facebook says they've created servers that are 38 percent more efficient than the ones they were buying, and simultaneously saved 24 percent in costs. And they hope the wider technology community will improve those numbers once they get their hands on Facebook's blueprint.

In a marketing video shown after the presentation, Heiliger sent a message to the industry. "Use it, improve it, and adapt it. Take our philosophy and adopt it in your own business. Sharing software has existed for many years, but it hasn't established a foothold in the hardware industry yet."

height, which allowed taller heat sinks and larger fans, and utilized a more efficient power supply, he said.

Overall, Facebook says they've created servers that are 38 percent more efficient than the ones they were buying, and simultaneously saved 24 percent in costs. And they hope the wider technology community will improve those numbers once they get their hands on Facebook's blueprint.

In a marketing video shown after the presentation, Heiliger sent a message to the industry. "Use it, improve it, and adapt it. Take our philosophy and adopt it in your own business. Sharing software has existed for many years, but it hasn't established a foothold in the hardware industry yet."

ycled for heating attached buildings. The data center also uses 480-volt electrical distribution centers throughout.

The server chassis itself has been stripped down to almost nothing, using 22 percent fewer materials, according to Amir Michael, who designed the new server for Facebook. They've employed a non-industry standard size server that's a little taller, 1.5u height, which allowed taller heat sinks and larger fans, and utilized a more efficient power supply, he said.

Overall, Facebook says they've created servers that are 38 percent more efficient than the ones they were buying, and simultaneously saved 24 percent in costs. And they hope the wider technology community will improve those numbers once they get their hands on Facebook's blueprint.

In a marketing video shown after the presentation, Heiliger sent a message to the industry. "Use it, improve it, and adapt it. Take our philosophy and adopt it in your own business. Sharing software has existed for many years, but it hasn't established a foothold in the hardware industry yet."

height, which allowed taller heat sinks and larger fans, and utilized a more efficient power supply, he said.

Overall, Facebook says they've created servers that are 38 percent more efficient than the ones they were buying, and simultaneously saved 24 percent in costs. And they hope the wider technology community will improve those numbers once they get their hands on Facebook's blueprint.

In a marketing video shown after the presentation, Heiliger sent a message to the industry. "Use it, improve it, and adapt it. Take our philosophy and adopt it in your own business. Sharing software has existed for many years, but it hasn't established a foothold in the hardware industry yet."

old in the hardware industry yet."


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